Thompson v. Alabama: Addressing the Racist Roots of Felon Disenfranchisement

By | November 14, 2016

by Danielle Lang, Deputy Director of Voting Rights and Anna Bodi, Partner Legal Fellow at The Campaign Legal Center

Larry Joe Newby is a U.S. citizen living in Huntsville, Alabama. Mr. Newby is married, attends church, is raising his two adopted grandsons and works for the County as an assistant supervisor. However, due to a few minor non-violent offenses from well over a decade ago, Mr. Newby has not been able to vote and will not be able to cast a ballot this November. Mr. Newby is just one of the 5.85 million citizens whose voices have been silenced by felony disenfranchisement laws across the United States. 75 percent of these disenfranchised voters are no longer in prison, but are still unable to vote.

Unwilling to accept the denial of his fundamental right to vote, Mr. Newby is a named plaintiff in a new lawsuit filed by the Campaign Legal Center, alongside a team of pro bono and civil rights litigators, that could finally turn the page on a dark history of discriminatory felon disenfranchisement in Alabama and nationwide.

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